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  • Communicating Risk: How we respond to risk and what that means for communication

    Latest News Communicating Risk: How we respond to risk and what that means for communication READ MORE Photo caption: ​ GALLERY RELATED CONTENTS RELATED CONTENTS ​ GEM participated recently in a UNDRR Geneva-sponsored webinar facilitated by Jeanette Elsworth, UNDRR Senior Public Information Officer. The webinar explores the emotive way people respond to risk, why even if armed with all the facts, we may still have trouble persuading people to do the right thing. The webinar also touched on what behavioral economics can teach us about the way we respond to risk, and how we apply this to policy making and public-facing media communications. Speakers include experts from behavioral economics and communications with introductory remarks from Mami Mizutori, Special Representative of the UN for Disaster Risk Reduction and Head of UNDRR. Kate Orkin, Senior Research Fellow in Behavioral Economics at the University of Oxford talked about ‘Incorporating how we behave under risk into COVID-19 communications’. She proposed that key messages must: speak socially, invoke the future and use every touch point you can to be effective in changing the intended audience’s behavior. Lisa Robinson, Head of Advisory, BBC Media Action presented the ‘3 common mistakes in designing risk communication’. She said that failure of risk communication strategies is due to the following: skimping on audience research, creating a snazzy product without a strategy for change, and avoiding conversation about risks. Ranil Dissanayake, adviser to the UK Department for International Development added that key messages and how they are designed are important in behavioral change but he also pointed out that key messages alone cannot be effective if the target demographic is faced by more immediate problems such as joblessness, poverty and hunger. However, he agreed with Kate and Lisa on the importance of understanding the intended audience in order to be effective in communicating risk. During the discussion, a trending topic focused on the importance of risk communication in changing behaviors, but participants also recognized the fact that it’s expensive and requires a lot of sustained work. Stephanie Speck, Head of Communications, Advocacy, Knowledge Management and IT, UNDRR gave the closing remarks, highlighting the possibility of a follow up webinar focusing on how to develop and implement a communication strategy when financial, material and human resources are limited. For the latest in risk communication online training and workshops, visit https://www.undrr.org/news-events/event-calendar . GALLERY No images found. RELATED CONTENTS VIDEO 1/0

  • Sub-Saharan Africa Geodetic Strain Rate Model 1.0undefined

    Publications SHORT INTRO In this report we describe the Sub-Saharan Africa Geodetic Strain Rate Model 1.0, which is a contribution to the Global Earthquake Model Foundation (GEM) Strain Rate Project. The objective of this work is to improve the latest GEM geodetic strain rate [..] ALL DETAILS Sub-Saharan Africa Geodetic Strain Rate Model 1.0 Please fill in the form below to download or view the document. Thank you. page Sub-Saharan Africa Geodetic Strain Rate Model 1.0 Sector arrow&v Country arrow&v I have read and agree to comply with the license terms of this product, and the conditions of products use. Reset fields Submit Download Additional Requests Provide feedback to GEM on the use and impact of the product e.g. feedback survey. Share with GEM where the product was used i.e. research, publications or projects. Thank you. Please click "download" button to get your item.

  • Africa Earthquake Model

    Please fill in the form below to download or view the document. Thank you. Africa Earthquake Model Product Additional Requests Sector arrow&v I have read and agree to comply with the license terms of this product, and the conditions of products use. Reset fields Submit Download Thank you. Please click Download to get your item. Provide feedback to GEM on the use and impact of the product e.g. feedback survey. Share with GEM where the product was used i.e. research, publications or projects.

  • Africa Earthquake Model: A major step in understanding earthquake risk in Africa

    Latest News Africa Earthquake Model: A major step in understanding earthquake risk in Africa READ MORE Photo caption: Aerial shot of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania urban center GALLERY RELATED CONTENTS RELATED CONTENTS Aerial shot of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania urban center The GEM Foundation released the Africa Earthquake Hazard and Risk model on 15th May 2019 in recognition of UNDRR's * Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction 2019 in Geneva. The technical data and information for this model can now be downloaded from the Africa Model webpage . The Africa Earthquake model underpins the African portion of GEM’s global maps released in December 2018. ​ “The Africa Earthquake Model is an important scientific contribution to ongoing efforts to reduce earthquake risk in Africa and globally.”- Djillali Benouar, Chair of Africa Science & Technology Advisory Group on DRR for the African Union. ​ The Africa Earthquake Model paints a complete picture of earthquake risk to the continent in terms of potential damage to buildings and direct economic loss. ​ The results can be used by risk managers, urban planners, emergency responders and humanitarian agencies for input to a wide range of disaster risk reduction activities including monitoring of the Sendai Framework indicators. ​ “Presently the model directly supports Sendai Framework Target C by providing estimates of direct economic losses at the national and subnational levels. Through further collaborative efforts, we plan to continue to improve the model to address Targets A, B and D by providing estimates of deaths, missing and affected persons, and impact to critical infrastructure,” said John Schneider, GEM Secretary General. ​ Read the complete text of the press release here . ​ ---------- * The former UNISDR has been formally renamed UNDRR. GALLERY No images found. RELATED CONTENTS VIDEO Africa Earthquake Hazard map Africa Earthquake Exposure map Africa Earthquake Risk map Africa Earthquake Hazard map 1/3

  • Selection of Ground Motion Prediction Equations for the Global Earthquake Modelundefined

    Publications SHORT INTRO Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) relate ground motion intensity measures to variables describing earthquake source, path, and site effects. From many available GMPEs, we select those models recommended for use in seismic hazard assessments in the Glo [..] ALL DETAILS Selection of Ground Motion Prediction Equations for the Global Earthquake Model Please fill in the form below to download or view the document. Thank you. page Selection of Ground Motion Prediction Equations for the Global Earthquake Model Sector arrow&v Country arrow&v I have read and agree to comply with the license terms of this product, and the conditions of products use. Reset fields Submit Download Additional Requests Provide feedback to GEM on the use and impact of the product e.g. feedback survey. Share with GEM where the product was used i.e. research, publications or projects. Thank you. Please click "download" button to get your item.

  • GEM | Who We Are

    who we are The GEM Foundation is a non-profit, public-private partnership that drives a global collaborative effort to develop scientific and high-quality resources for transparent assessment of earthquake risk and to facilitate their application for risk management around the globe. ​ Assisted by an initiative of the OECD's Global Science Forum, GEM was formed in 2009 as a non-profit foundation in Pavia, Italy, funded through a public-private sponsorship with the vision to create a world that is resilient to earthquakes . GEM’s mission is to become one of the world’s most complete sources of risk resources and a globally accepted standard for seismic risk assessment; and to ensure that its products are applied in earthquake risk management worldwide. Openness Open data, open software, transparent processes, freely accessible to the public Collaboration Public-private partnership, inclusiveness, working together across geographies and disciplines Credibility Commitment to scientific credibility, trusted by local and global partners and peers Public Good Motivated by the welfare of the public, works to serve the public good CORE PRINCIPLES GEM builds capacity to assess and manage risk through open, transparent and collaborative seismic risk assessment at local, national, regional and global scales. Using state-of-the-art tools, GEM is committed to share and advocate open, reliable earthquake risk information to support sound disaster risk-reduction planning at various levels.

  • GEM2020: Year in Review

    Latest News GEM2020: Year in Review READ MORE Photo caption: ​ GALLERY RELATED CONTENTS RELATED CONTENTS ​ The year 2020 was a milestone year for GEM, because of the significant advances made in capacity development, new projects and partnerships, products released and participation in virtual events, which were accomplished during a difficult period of time due to the ongoing pandemic. Close to 300 individuals were trained online on seismic hazard and risk analysis using OpenQuake engine software under the USAID-supported TREQ project – officially launched in Quito, Ecuador in March. The online training workshops given in Spanish and English versions reached more than 30 countries worldwide. GEM collaborated with ADB , EdF France , AXA/IDF and the World Bank for various new projects that ranged from developing a new disaster risk transfer facility in Central Asia, to an advanced approach for seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants; and from building capacity and risk understanding in Georgia to building a public-private partnership to protect public schools from natural hazards in Peru. Five new partners teamed up with GEM to work in several related but different areas of research and application: innovative disaster resilience - One Concern; enhancement of loss modelling capabilities for better decision making - EdF and AXAXL; utilization of seismic sensors to assess building vulnerability - Safehub; and development of high-performance computing in the field of geophysical hazards - CHeeSe. Four public and private institutions also renewed their respective commitments to support GEM in the years ahead. Last July, GEM launched its products and services strategy to reach a wider range of stakeholders. A new Products page was launched in April and has accumulated more than 2800 downloads of open products as of November. On October 13th, UN’s IDRR Day, GEM released seven regional and national earthquake models giving open access to seismic hazard and risk data to the public. In a special edition released on October 22nd, Earthquake Spectra published 16 peer-reviewed papers documenting the GEM2018 earthquake mosaic of models published . On World Bank’s Understanding Risk Forum 10th year anniversary (December 3rd), GEM launched three global earthquake social vulnerability and resilience maps aimed at better understanding the various socio-economic factors that can exacerbate the impact of earthquakes. In addition, GEM also released population and building exposure data for more than 40 countries under the METEOR project. Due to the ongoing pandemic, Vitor put together an experimental map combining COVID-19 statistics over the GEM global earthquake risk map (2018) to show areas where a damaging earthquake could cause increases in COVID-19 cases due to displacement of people from damaged buildings or where health care systems may be further stressed due to human injuries. GEM also contributed to two major publications: two case studies on risk analytics and seismic hazard assessment for the IDF Development of Risk Analytics Report , and the Hazard Definitions Report: Understanding Hazards to Reduce Risk co-published by UNDRR and the International Science Council. This year also marked the 10th year anniversary of GEM’s flagship product: the OpenQuake engine software . About 250 people participated in a special GEM webinar marking the celebration. GEM also released three OpenQuake engine software updates, adding various features to enhance performance and capability to analyze multi-perils. GALLERY No images found. RELATED CONTENTS VIDEO 1/6

  • Earthquake Model for the European-Mediterranean Region for the purpose of GEM1undefined

    Publications SHORT INTRO This is an external report, produced within the scope of the GEM1 project. GEM1 was a focused pilot project of the Global Earthquake Model initiative, which ran from January 1st 2009 to March 31st 2010 and was aimed at generating GEM’s first products and devel [..] ALL DETAILS Earthquake Model for the European-Mediterranean Region for the purpose of GEM1 Please fill in the form below to download or view the document. Thank you. page Earthquake Model for the European-Mediterranean Region for the purpose of GEM1 Sector arrow&v Country arrow&v I have read and agree to comply with the license terms of this product, and the conditions of products use. Reset fields Submit Download Additional Requests Provide feedback to GEM on the use and impact of the product e.g. feedback survey. Share with GEM where the product was used i.e. research, publications or projects. Thank you. Please click "download" button to get your item.

  • africa-exposure-model

    Products Africa Exposure Model Product type Model Now DESCRIPTION This dataset introduces a new exposure model for all African countries using national and global datasets with a uniform approach across the continent, developed for a baseline year (2020) and six future years (2025, 2030, 2035, 2040, 2045, and 2050). West Africa This dataset introduces a new exposure model for West African countries using national and global datasets with a uniform approach across the continent, developed for a baseline year (2020) and six future years (2025, 2030, 2035, 2040, 2045, and 2050). Maintained by GEM Product type Model Availability Now View Documentation Request an NDA Product restrictions Open By Attribution, Share-Alike and Commercial use provided the by-products are shared under the same conditions as the original license License type CC BY-SA Request for Commercial License Request for Commercial Use South Africa This dataset introduces a new exposure model for South African countries using national and global datasets with a uniform approach across the continent, developed for a baseline year (2020) and six future years (2025, 2030, 2035, 2040, 2045, and 2050). Maintained by GEM Product type Model Availability Now View Documentation Request an NDA Product restrictions Open By Attribution, Share-Alike and Commercial use provided the by-products are shared under the same conditions as the original license License type CC BY-SA Request for Commercial License Request for Commercial Use North Africa This dataset introduces a new exposure model for North African countries using national and global datasets with a uniform approach across the continent, developed for a baseline year (2020) and six future years (2025, 2030, 2035, 2040, 2045, and 2050). Maintained by GEM Product type Model Availability Now View Documentation Request an NDA Product restrictions Open By Attribution, Share-Alike and Commercial use provided the by-products are shared under the same conditions as the original license License type CC BY-SA Request for Commercial License Request for Commercial Use East Africa This dataset introduces a new exposure model for East African countries using national and global datasets with a uniform approach across the continent, developed for a baseline year (2020) and six future years (2025, 2030, 2035, 2040, 2045, and 2050). Maintained by GEM Product type Model Availability Now View Documentation Request an NDA Product restrictions Open By Attribution, Share-Alike and Commercial use provided the by-products are shared under the same conditions as the original license License type CC BY-SA Request for Commercial License Request for Commercial Use Central Africa This dataset introduces a new exposure model for Central African countries using national and global datasets with a uniform approach across the continent, developed for a baseline year (2020) and six future years (2025, 2030, 2035, 2040, 2045, and 2050). Maintained by GEM Product type Model Availability Now View Documentation Request an NDA Product restrictions Open By Attribution, Share-Alike and Commercial use provided the by-products are shared under the same conditions as the original license License type CC BY-SA Request for Commercial License Request for Commercial Use GEM License Types AGPL – GNU Affero General Public License, used mostly for software CC BY – Creative Commons, By-Attribution CC BY-SA – Creative Commons, By-Attribution, Share-Alike CC BY-NC-SA – Creative Commons, By Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-Alike NDA – Non-Disclosure Agreement (By request for public-good, non-commercial use.) Other/Commercial – If a product is not available under a license that suits your needs, such as for commercial application, please contact us to discuss your use case and other partnership/licensing options and fees. More details on GEM’s licensing terms here . Apologies for the inconvenience, the online NDA application is temporarily unavailable due to ongoing revisions.Please send your request to product@globalquakemodel.org . Thank you.

  • News Briefs December 2019 TOPIQS Newsletter

    Latest News News Briefs December 2019 TOPIQS Newsletter READ MORE Photo caption: GEM Governing Board and Secretariat, Pavia, Italy, December 2019 GALLERY RELATED CONTENTS RELATED CONTENTS GEM Governing Board and Secretariat, Pavia, Italy, December 2019 European Facilities for Earthquake Hazard and Risk workshop The main aim of the workshop was to obtain feedback on the ESHM20 model, such that it can be updated and released in April 2020. Marco Pagani and Kendra Johnson of the GEM Hazard Team participated in the workshop held in October, in Pavia, Italy. Accelerating Global science In Tsunami Hazard and Risk analysis meeting in Malta The purpose of the kick-off meeting was to set the stage for probabilistic hazard and risk analysis methods and current state-of-the-art. Invited experts introduced the different aspects of PTHA and PTRA. Kendra Johnson of the GEM Hazard Team participated in the meeting held in October, in Valletta, Malta. EAFIT workshop A half day workshop was organized by GEM for the visiting EAFIT University engineering students in October at the GEM Headquarters in Pavia, Italy. The purpose of the workshop was to learn more about GEM’ work in the disaster risk reduction space and to introduce the students to various GEM tools such as the OpenQuake suite. OpenQuake: UABC Tijuana, Mexico Multiple meetings were organized with researchers from the Autonomous University of Baja California (UABC), lead by Prof. Mario Gonzales. Presentations of the GEM Foundation activities and potential collaborative projects were held with Tijuana's Town Hall members, the representatives of the university, and with a wide audience of students. In addition, as part of the volunteering EERI San Diego Chapter initiative for the binational Earthquake Scenario Risk Assessment in the San Diego-Tijuana area, two days of customized OpenQuake training for the Tijuana's working group was organised at the UABC. Significant progress was observed, and future collaboration are envisaged with the university as part of the TREQ project. VOBP Mexico The Volcano Observatory Best Practices meeting was organised by the CENAPRED, USGS, VDAP, and IGV in Mexico City. Representatives from more than 25 countries attended the meeting, in which GEM had the opportunity to present the work done in the OpenQuake engine for earthquakes and volcanoes risk assessment. GRAF Expert Group Meeting The purpose of the GRAF Expert Group is to provide guidance and direction in the development of the Global Risk Assessment Framework of the UNDRR. The 4th Meeting of the Expert Group was held in November 2019, Geneva, Switzerland. John Schneider, GEM Secretary General participated in the meeting. John also co-chairs the working group on Mapping & Gap Analysis. Murray Journeay, NRCan,also attended the meeting as a guest to present NRCan’s approach to developing risk indicators targeted at various stakeholder groups to inform DRR activities and Sendai Framework DRR reporting. American Geosciences Union (AGU) Fall Conference The AGU Fall Meeting is the largest international Earth and space science meeting in the world. The purpose of this year’s meeting is to discuss the rapid developments in geoscience, new approaches to observing Earth and beyond, the introduction of new data streams, growing demand for accessible science, the expansion of convergent science, and more. John Schneider and Kendra Johnson participated in the meeting this December in San Francisco, USA. IAStructE Performance Based Earthquake Engineering Seminar Anirudh Rao from the GEM Risk team delivered a keynote presentation on GEM’s earthquake risk model for India at an international seminar on performance based earthquake engineering in New Delhi on 9th November 2019. Anirudh was invited to speak at the seminar by the Indian Association of Structural Engineers (IAStructE), which organized the event. GALLERY No images found. RELATED CONTENTS VIDEO 1/0