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  • GMPE Strong Motion Modeller's Toolkit (v.2020) | Global EarthQuake Model Foundation

    Products GMPE Strong Motion Modeller's Toolkit (v.2020) Product type Software Now DESCRIPTION Python and OpenQuake-based Toolkit for Analysis of Strong Motions and Interpretation of GMPEs GMPE Strong Motion Modeller's Toolkit (v.2020) Python and OpenQuake-based Toolkit for Analysis of Strong Motions and Interpretation of GMPEs Maintained by GEM Product type Software Availability Now View Documentation Request an NDA Product restrictions Open By Attribution, Share-Alike and Commercial use provided the by-products are shared under the same conditions as the original license License type AGPL Request for Commercial License Request for Commercial Use GEM License Types AGPL – GNU Affero General Public License, used mostly for software CC BY – Creative Commons, By-Attribution CC BY-SA – Creative Commons, By-Attribution, Share-Alike CC BY-NC-SA – Creative Commons, By Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-Alike NDA – Non-Disclosure Agreement (By request for public-good, non-commercial use.) Other/Commercial – If a product is not available under a license that suits your needs, such as for commercial application, please contact us to discuss your use case and other partnership/licensing options and fees. More details on GEM’s licensing terms here . Apologies for the inconvenience, the online NDA application is temporarily unavailable due to ongoing revisions.Please send your request to product@globalquakemodel.org . Thank you.

  • GEM participates in the 2nd Scientific Seminar of the Knowledge Centre for Disaster Risk Management: Science for Policy and Operations

    Latest News GEM participates in the 2nd Scientific Seminar of the Knowledge Centre for Disaster Risk Management: Science for Policy and Operations READ MORE Photo caption: ​ GALLERY RELATED CONTENTS RELATED CONTENTS ​ GEM participated in the 2nd Scientific Seminar of the DRMKC held from March 9-10, 2017 in Rome. This year’s theme is Science for Policy and Operations. Paul Henshaw, representing GEM presented the capabilities and latest features of the OpenQuake engine, GEM’s state-of-the-art, open source software for seismic hazard and risk modeling, to a group of interdisciplinary experts on Disaster Risk Management and Climate Change Adaptation including scientists, practitioners and policy-makers at national, regional and international levels as well as first responders, and private sector representatives. This year’s seminar aims to address the challenges for policy and science in Disaster Risk Reduction including Disaster Risk Management capabilities assessment and Sendai monitoring framework, and to draw concrete recommendations for the upcoming Global Platform that will be held in Cancun, Mexico in May. The 2-day seminar attracted around 100 inter-disciplinary experts on disaster management, early detection, forecasting, warning and risk assessment of natural and man-made disasters, in both the fields of civil protection and humanitarian aid. The Italian Department of Civil Protection hosted the 2nd Annual Scientific Seminar from 9-10 March 2017, Rome, Italy. GALLERY No images found. RELATED CONTENTS 1/0

  • GEM and Aon to Collaborate on the Development of a New Earthquake Model for Canada

    Latest News GEM and Aon to Collaborate on the Development of a New Earthquake Model for Canada READ MORE Photo caption: ​ GALLERY RELATED CONTENTS RELATED CONTENTS ​ GEM and Aon’s Impact Forecasting catastrophe model development team have signed a partnership agreement to develop a new earthquake model for Canada based on global collaborative science and the latest publicly available data and information from Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). The new model is expected to be available towards the end of 2019. The partnership will help gain deeper understanding of earthquake risk in Canada. The new model will allow insurance underwriters to more accurate pricing of their insurance products as well as effectively manage their portfolios. Consumers will also benefit because the model is based on openly available data and assumptions that are fully transparent to everyone. The model will be implemented in Impact Forecasting’s risk modeling platform – ELEMENTS – as well as Oasis-based platforms. Impact Forecasting will support the use of the model in the Canadian market, which includes deployment, training and ongoing support. “GEM and Aon both value the importance of transparent and open hazard and risk modeling. We believe that this approach is key to better technical understanding of risk, and directly supports GEM’s initiative to promote the sharing of high quality open risk information globally,” said John Schneider, GEM Secretary General. “We have chosen to partner with GEM because of its global reputation for open and high-quality science and engineering-based risk modelling, combined with their close collaboration with Natural Resources Canada. In addition we are excited to bring enhanced understanding of this earthquake risk to the insurance industry with a goal of ultimately increasing resilience across Canada,” added Adam Podlaha, Head of Aon’s Impact Forecasting team. The model is being developed in phases starting with earthquake shaking including liquefaction, tsunami and other secondary perils. Tsunami modeling will be implemented in collaboration with University College London (UCL). The proposed modeling solution from Impact Forecasting will be based on GEM’s earthquake risk model for Canada, developed in collaboration with NRCan, which officially joined GEM as a public sponsor last year. NRCan leads a consortium of Canadian organizations including Public Safety Canada, Insurance Bureau of Canada, Defence Research and Development Canada, as well as academic and planning professionals. Phil Hill, Director, Geological Survey of Canada-Pacific (NRCan), and GEM Governing Board member for Canada, commented, “The GEM-IF Canada earthquake risk model is an important step in making credible and open disaster risk information available and accessible in Canada.” GALLERY No images found. RELATED CONTENTS 1/0

  • OpenQuake Platform (v.2019) | Global EarthQuake Model Foundation

    Products OpenQuake Platform (v.2019) Product type Software Now DESCRIPTION The OpenQuake Platform is a website that allows the community to explore, manipulate and visualize the datasets and models and to use tools that GEM produces. The platform also allows users to contribute, share and discuss new findings and results with the GEM community. OpenQuake Platform (v.2019) The OpenQuake Platform is a website that allows the community to explore, manipulate and visualize the datasets and models and to use tools that GEM produces. The platform also allows users to contribute, share and discuss new findings and results with the GEM community. Maintained by GEM Product type Software Availability Now View Documentation Request an NDA Product restrictions Open By Attribution, Share-Alike and Commercial use provided the by-products are shared under the same conditions as the original license License type AGPL Request for Commercial License Request for Commercial Use GEM License Types AGPL – GNU Affero General Public License, used mostly for software CC BY – Creative Commons, By-Attribution CC BY-SA – Creative Commons, By-Attribution, Share-Alike CC BY-NC-SA – Creative Commons, By Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-Alike NDA – Non-Disclosure Agreement (By request for public-good, non-commercial use.) Other/Commercial – If a product is not available under a license that suits your needs, such as for commercial application, please contact us to discuss your use case and other partnership/licensing options and fees. More details on GEM’s licensing terms here . Apologies for the inconvenience, the online NDA application is temporarily unavailable due to ongoing revisions.Please send your request to product@globalquakemodel.org . Thank you.

  • Global hazard map (v.2018.1) | Global EarthQuake Model Foundation

    Products Global hazard map (v.2018.1) Product type Global map (analog) Now DESCRIPTION The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) Global Seismic Hazard Map (version 2018.1) depicts the geographic distribution of the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) with a 10% probability of being exceeded in 50 years, computed for reference rock conditions (shear wave velocity, Vs30, of 760-800 m/s). PDF, PNG The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) Global Seismic Hazard Map (version 2018.1) depicts the geographic distribution of the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) with a 10% probability of being exceeded in 50 years, computed for reference rock conditions (shear wave velocity, V , of 760-800 m/s). Maintained by GEM Product type Global map (analog) Availability Now View Documentation Request an NDA Product restrictions Open By Attribution and Share-Alike but not for commercial use License type CC BY-SA Request for Commercial License Request for Commercial Use GEM License Types AGPL – GNU Affero General Public License, used mostly for software CC BY – Creative Commons, By-Attribution CC BY-SA – Creative Commons, By-Attribution, Share-Alike CC BY-NC-SA – Creative Commons, By Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-Alike NDA – Non-Disclosure Agreement (By request for public-good, non-commercial use.) Other/Commercial – If a product is not available under a license that suits your needs, such as for commercial application, please contact us to discuss your use case and other partnership/licensing options and fees. More details on GEM’s licensing terms here . Apologies for the inconvenience, the online NDA application is temporarily unavailable due to ongoing revisions.Please send your request to product@globalquakemodel.org . Thank you.

  • Global vulnerability (Buildings) | Global EarthQuake Model Foundation

    Products Global vulnerability (Buildings) Product type Global map (digital) Now DESCRIPTION The Global Vulnerability digital database includes data for commercial, industrial, residential (including 600 curves funded by USAID). Global vulnerability (Buildings) This is a global digital database produced by GEM. The Global Vulnerability digital database includes data for commercial, industrial, residential (including 600 curves funded by USAID). Maintained by GEM Product type Dataset Availability Now View Documentation Request an NDA Product restrictions Open By Attribution, Share-Alike and Commercial use provided the by-products are shared under the same conditions as the original license License type CC BY-SA Request for Commercial License Request for Commercial Use Development of a fragility and vulnerability model for global seismic risk analyses | SpringerLink GEM License Types AGPL – GNU Affero General Public License, used mostly for software CC BY – Creative Commons, By-Attribution CC BY-SA – Creative Commons, By-Attribution, Share-Alike CC BY-NC-SA – Creative Commons, By Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-Alike NDA – Non-Disclosure Agreement (By request for public-good, non-commercial use.) Other/Commercial – If a product is not available under a license that suits your needs, such as for commercial application, please contact us to discuss your use case and other partnership/licensing options and fees. More details on GEM’s licensing terms here . Apologies for the inconvenience, the online NDA application is temporarily unavailable due to ongoing revisions.Please send your request to product@globalquakemodel.org . Thank you.

  • TREQ2020 – Capacity development and OpenQuake online training, year in review

    Latest News TREQ2020 – Capacity development and OpenQuake online training, year in review READ MORE Photo caption: ​ GALLERY RELATED CONTENTS RELATED CONTENTS ​ The TREQ project is assessing earthquake risk at community level in three metropolitan centers in Latin America: Quito, Ecuador; Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic; and Cali, Colombia. In order to cope with the current pandemic, the GEM team shifted the capacity training and on-site workshops to online activities. Aiming to continue and strengthen the local participation in the project activities, 12 OpenQuake online training sessions (3 hours each) have been conducted for more than 200 people in several Latin American countries, with predominant participation from the three TREQ countries (Ecuador, Colombia, and Dominican Republic). The online workshops have increased the reach of the training sessions beyond its original scope. Free online working sessions are available through a dedicated website available in English and Spanish, https://www.training.openquake.org/ , allowing participants around the globe to engage in OpenQuake training activities for earthquake hazard and risk assessment. The online sessions are divided into four modules that cover the basic concepts: Introduction to OpenQuake and Open Source Tools for Earthquake Hazard and Risk Assessment, Earthquake Scenarios, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA), and Probabilistic Event-Based Risk Assessment. All the materials generated for the workshops have been incorporated into the training website. The project team has collected more than 200 responses with excellent and encouraging feedback, which helped the team to shape and improve the material and content of the training. Below is some of the feedback from the participants. “A great course! Very useful for us to start doing work using this great powerful software.” - Zivko Terzic, Melbourne, Australia "I really liked the experience and I would like to take this workshop to my students of the Master's Degree in Earthquake Engineering so that we can do research projects." - Maribel Guzman, PUCMM, Dominican Republic "Delighted with the information presented and the material is excellent, including the modeling software" - Hernán Suárez, Risk Management Unit - Municipality of Quito, Ecuador "Congratulations on the development of the tool and your training! Very very interesting and useful." - Srahyrlandy Rocio Díaz, Risk management secretariat, Cali, Colombia "Excellent explanations. Excellent materials and Excellent speakers" - Jonatan Arreola, CENAPRED, Mexico Upcoming OpenQuake online training workshops are scheduled for February and March, 2021 . For more details, visit https://www.training.openquake.org/register . Next steps Expansion to other regions In 2020, the activities focused in Latin America, giving special emphasis to materials and sessions in Spanish. But in 2021, the TREQ project team is keen on expanding and improving the training activities to other regions, by providing materials in English and promoting the online training in Asia and Africa. Training the trainers Within the context of TREQ, five professors of civil engineering - Ana Beatriz Acevedo (EAFIT, Colombia), José Carlos Gil (UMG, Guatemala), Mario González ( UABC, Mexico), Manuel Alfredo López (UES, El Salvador) and Rolando Castillo (UCR, Costa Rica) - are preparing an academic course on seismic hazard and risk assessment. The course is being structured to be taught to undergraduate and master students over the course of an academic semester (15 to 16 weeks) using the training material from TREQ, including the manual for the development of seismic hazard and risk models, video tutorials and evaluation exercises on fundamentals of seismic risk and the use of OpenQuake. The training materials are already being used at EAFIT and will be presented for approval in the other universities in 2021. GALLERY No images found. RELATED CONTENTS 1/7

  • Will measuring losses to natural disasters really tell us about changes in risk?

    Latest News Will measuring losses to natural disasters really tell us about changes in risk? READ MORE Photo caption: ​ GALLERY RELATED CONTENTS RELATED CONTENTS ​ Two years ago, in March 2015, representatives of 187 countries met in Sendai, Japan to agree to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction for the period 2015 to 2030. Last month, on February 2nd, the UN General Assembly approved seven global targets to reduce risk from natural disasters, and agreed to a set of indicators for measuring global progress toward these targets. The indicators for Targets A, B, and C aim to reduce by 2030 mortality, affected people, and economic loss, respectively. The targets will be to reduce impacts in a relative sense, so that mortality and affected people will be measured per 100,000 population; and economic loss will be measured in relation to gross domestic product. Global Target D aims to reduce risk to critical infrastructure, including health and educational facilities. In the article “How can the world reduce losses for the poor?” Robert Glasser, UNISDR, states that the measurement of the indicators introduces a “major degree of accountability” for the seven global targets, but will the proposed measurement of disaster losses actually be useful for monitoring changes in risk? The answer is yes and no. Why the Sendai indicators are not enoughWhile measuring these indicators will be quite useful, it is highly unlikely that this monitoring process alone will allow the world to accurately measure the actual reduction in risk, particularly for rare, high impact events, such as major earthquakes, cyclones and volcanic eruptions. For instance, Munich Re estimates that worldwide the average annual deaths for the past ten years from all natural disasters was about 60,000 people, while last year accounted for only 8,600 deaths. Yet, in the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami, more than 230,000 people died in a single event. With such a high variation in annual losses at the global scale, there is little chance that monitoring such variation alone will give us an accurate picture of risk at a global scale, and certainly not at a national or urban scale. An alternative way of more accurately measuring riskBy the end of 2018, GEM will have produced a global earthquake risk model, which will provide a baseline at national level for earthquake hazard and risk globally. Moreover, the model and all of the tools and data underlying the model will be available openly, freely and transparently for the public good. This information can and should be used to monitor risk. Since risk is a function of hazard, vulnerability and exposure, the trends in these variables measured over time will allow us to determine the extent to which we are meeting the global targets for risk reduction. Moreover, this will be possible not only at the global level, but also at the national and even urban/local levels. Changes in exposure will be necessary to determine how the distribution of population, assets and investments are evolving spatially and temporally. Similarly, measuring vulnerability will be critical to understand how social, physical and economic factors are evolving and contributing to changing risk. Changes in the physical risk to schools, hospitals and other vulnerable building types can be estimated at local to global levels by collecting exposure and vulnerability information and tracking retrofits and new construction over time. One approach would be to collect information on the ratios of numbers of buildings constructed above and below building code standards, such as for unreinforced masonry, the building class most vulnerable to earthquake damage and casualties. Trends could be tracked to estimate changes in risk in terms of potential physical and economic loss. Finally, disaster mitigation could be incentivized by providing tools to demonstrate the cost-benefits of retrofitting or replacing these and other vulnerable buildings in high-risk areas. Thus, the information in risk models can be used to both track changes in risk as well as to identify cost-effective opportunities for risk mitigation and reduction activities. GEM’s contribution to disaster risk reductionGEM is very well placed to assist in the process of informing the recently agreed Sendai targets by working with countries to develop national earthquake hazard models, by assisting in collecting and analyzing vulnerability and exposure data, and by combining this information into a risk modeling and monitoring framework at national and urban levels. This would be accomplished by further developing partnerships in developing countries to increase their capacity to assess and manage earthquake risks. GEM is also developing tools that can be used in both developing and developed countries to assess the costs and benefits of mitigating and/or reducing these risks. With continued investment over time, these and other risk models, tools and data can be further developed to provide much needed support to achieving the goals of the Sendai Framework. GALLERY No images found. RELATED CONTENTS 1/0

  • Performance Evaluation of Machine Learning Algorithms for Urban Pattern Recognition from Multi-spectral Satellite Images. Remote Sensing

    Publications SHORT INTRO In this study, a classification and performance evaluation framework for the recognition of urban patterns in medium (Landsat ETM, TM and MSS) and very high resolution (WorldView-2, Quickbird, Ikonos) multi-spectral satellite images is presented. The study aim [..] ALL DETAILS Performance Evaluation of Machine Learning Algorithms for Urban Pattern Recognition from Multi-spectral Satellite Images. Remote Sensing Please fill in the form below to download or view the document. Thank you. page Performance Evaluation of Machine Learning Algorithms for Urban Pattern Recognition from Multi-spectral Satellite Images. Remote Sensing Additional Requests Provide feedback to GEM on the use and impact of the product e.g. feedback survey. Share with GEM where the product was used i.e. research, publications or projects. Reset fields Submit Download Thank you. Please click "download" button to get your item. I have read and agree to comply with the license terms of this product, and the conditions of products use. Sector arrow&v

  • 100 Resilient Cities CoLab Workshop in Cali, Colombia

    Latest News 100 Resilient Cities CoLab Workshop in Cali, Colombia READ MORE Photo caption: ​ GALLERY RELATED CONTENTS RELATED CONTENTS ​ 100 Resilient Cities – pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation (100RC), held a collaborative workshop (CoLab) in Cali, Colombia from 20-22 February on the resilience of school infrastructure. Cali is located in the southwestern part of the country and is Colombia’s third largest city, with a metropolitan population of about 2-1/2 million people. Cali is at very high at risk from earthquake, as well as flood and landslide hazards. John Schneider, GEM Secretary General was invited to attend the CoLab workshop on behalf of GEM as a prospective partner in 100RC, potentially to work with Cali and other cities in the 100RC network to improve understanding of earthquake risks. He said “the 100RC CoLab workshop was a great way to meet 100RC partners, city officials and other stakeholders committed to developing resilient cities, and to see how reducing risks to disasters such as earthquakes can play an important part in the process.” The CoLab was attended by about 50 people, the majority from the Municipality of Cali (Mayor’s office as well as departments of education, risk management, and planning), and the remainder from the 100RC team (led by Vivian Argueta Bernal, Cali Chief Resilience Officer), together with international partners including AIR Worldwide (Alvaro Farias); International Code Council (Alberto Herrera); Build Change (Anna Pavan); Geohazards International (Janise Rodgers); and World Bank (Fernando Ramirez and Fred Krimgold). The workshop focused on Cali’s ambitious USD 170 million dollar program called “My Community, My School” which seeks to improve the quality of Cali’s public educational system. The aim is to fund improvements to about 150 schools over the next several years, including improving physical infrastructure (e.g., new construction and seismic retrofit), as well as making qualitative improvements in school programs. Some of the key discussion points in the workshop were to consider how to design (or redesign) schools to be centers of their local communities, to be safe and sustainable, and to be the foundations for a resilient Cali. Cali Mayor Maurice Armitage said, “Cuando hablo de resiliencia, que es una palabra rara en Colombia, me refiero a buscar que esos colegios que estamos remodelando o que estamos construyendo se conviertan en los establecimientos donde la gente se puede refugiar." (When I speak of resilience, which is a rare word in Colombia, I mean to look for those schools that we are remodeling or that we are building to become the establishments where people can take refuge.)(Source: http://www.cali.gov.co/resiliencia/publicaciones/139149/colab-es-una-gran-oportunidad-para-invertir-de-manera-resiliente-en-educacion-armitage/ ) The workshop promoted interaction between local and international experts to exchange ideas about the design of safe and sustainable schools, and the importance of schools as part of a resilient community. The workshop also produced a set of recommendations for projects for consideration by the Mayor as part of a master plan for the development and maintenance of the school system. As part of the visit to Cali, John also met with Hans Jürgen Meyer and Cristina Rosales of Corporación OSSO, a non-profit and public-good organization based in Cali and devoted to natural hazard and risk research and applications to society. OSSO works closely with the Department of Planning in Cali to develop flood, earthquake and landslide hazard maps. GEM is now assisting OSSO to use the OpenQuake suite of tools for earthquake hazard and risk assessment, which has resulted in a pilot study of earthquake risk in Cali. OSSO has also contributed improvements to GEM’s IDC tools, including a Spanish version of the mobile app. GEM looks forward to working with OSSO in the future on urban risk assessment issues. GALLERY No images found. RELATED CONTENTS 1/0